Doctors in Performance

The first festival conference of music performance and artistic research

University of the Arts Helsinki–Sibelius Academy

Helsinki Music Centre, Sept. 4–5, 2014

Organizer: DocMus Doctoral School

Download the Conference Book here

(Updated 7 September 2014)

The performances and lectures are open for the public - free admittance

 

The DocMus Doctoral School at the Sibelius Academy Helsinki invites artistic research performers at doctoral and post-doctoral levels to take part in the first festival conference of music performance and artistic research.

Keynote performers:

  • Laurence Dreyfus, PhD (Columbia), Diplôme Supérieur (Brussels), Hon RAM, FBA, D.Litt (Oxon) 
  • Matti Raekallio, DMus (Sibelius Academy), Pianist, Professor at Juilliard School (NY)

Since 1988, Sibelius Academy has offered a doctoral degree through its Arts Study Program, where the main focus of study is on independent artistic work. This means that after their master's degrees, musicians can still continue to develop the very essence of their skills—their artistic work. Through their studies, artistic doctoral students also develop their skills in the field of artistic research, but this never suppresses the artistic focus, the actual music making. The organizer of the festival conference, the DocMus Doctoral School, has for more than two decades acted as a pioneer agent in developing the artistic Doctor of Music degree in Europe.

In September 2014, doctoral students working in the fields of musical performance and practice-based or artistic research (in music; Western art music, jazz, folk music) are invited to participate in a new festival conference, Doctors in Performance. In general, conferences with an actual performance focus are rare if not non-existent. Instead of exclusively introducing paper presentations or having live performances as a curiosity or mere decoration, Doctors in Performance highlights the music itself. Therefore, each of the presentations will consist of a musical performance (solo or chamber music) of 40 minutes maximum. The performance can take the form of a recital or a concert lecture. The music performed is expected to include or relate closely to the contents of the doctoral degree the student is pursuing. Those who have already achieved their doctoral degrees can focus on their postdoctoral topics. A paper presentation on artistic research (20 minutes maximum) is also possible in the auditorium sessions (only an upright piano will be available).

The conference language is English and all presentations should be in English.

Forms for presentations:

  1. recital, 40' (+ 10' discussion)
  2. concert lecture, 40' (+ 10' discussion)
  3. paper presentation, 20'(+ 5' discussion)

Doctors in Performance will offer three halls for recitals and an auditorium for paper presentations. See links about the available halls:

A grand piano, three organs and a harpsichord are available for performers. Also a limited set of percussion instruments will be available. The festival prefers programmes with small percussion sets.

Conference proceedings for Doctors in Performance will be published in advance on the conference website and in print. This will serve as a concert programme as well as provide background information about the participants and their research topics. The applicants are therefore encouraged to include written comments discussing how their artistic and other research work support each other and towards which common goal they are directed.

The proposal must be accompanied by

  • a detailed program of the recital (not more than 40 minutes): composers, work titles, composition years, opus numbers)
  • a written summary of the student's doctoral degree studies and research topics (500 words maximum)
  • curriculum vitae and contact information
  • equipment needed for performances and presentations (all instruments, data projectors, etc.)

Please, fill in the on-line submission form and submit it as instructed. The submission time is 15th January - 1st March 2014.

The proposals will be peer-reviewed anonymously. Successful contributors will be notified via email by 1st May 2014.

For further information, please contact:

  • Anu Vehviläinen, DMus, pianist, assistant professor, anu(at)vehvilainen.net
  • Markus Kuikka, DMus, coordinator of doctoral studiesmarkus.kuikka(at)uniarts.fi

Keynotes

Laurence Dreyfus, University Lecturer and Fellow of Magdalen College, was born in Boston, Mass. (USA), and is a noted interpreter of Johann Sebastian Bach, both as a scholar and performer. His other interests include English consort music of the 16th and 17th centuries and the works of Richard Wagner. As an historian and analyst, Dreyfus has published Bach's Continuo Group as well as Bach and the Patterns of Invention (Harvard University Press, 1987 and 1996), the latter of which won the Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society for the best book of the year. As a bass viol player, he has recorded CDs of Bach's viola da gamba sonatas of Marais' Pièces de violes and Rameau's Pièces de clavecin en concert (all with Ketil Haugsand on the Simax label).

In 1994, Dreyfus founded Phantasm, a quartet of viols, whose debut recording of Purcell's Viol Fantasies won a 1997 Gramophone Award. Seven further Phantasm CDs (on Simax, EMI, GMN, and Channel Classics) were devoted to works by Byrd, Mico, Locke, and Lawes, alongside a rendition of Bach's Art of Fugue. Phantasm's disc of Orlando Gibbons's Consorts (AVIE) won the 2004Gramophone Award and was a finalist for Record of the Year. Their CD from 2005 is called Four Temperaments, with Elizabethan music by Byrd, Ferrabosco, Parsons and Tallis was nominated for awards by Gramophone and the BBC Music Magazine. Most recently, Phantasm issued Jenkins Consorts in Six Parts (AVIE).

Dreyfus holds a PhD in musicology from Columbia University in New York, where he studied under noted Bach scholar Christoph Wolff. He studied cello at the Juilliard School in New York with Leonard Rose, and viol at the Royal Conservatoire with Wieland Kuijken at Brussels, which awarded him its Diplome supérieur with highest distinction. Dreyfus taught at Yale, Chicago and Stanford universities moving to London where he held a Chair at the Royal Academy of Music and King's College London as the Thurston Dart Professor of Performance Studies. He was elected an honorary member of the Royal Academy of Music in 1995 and (for his musicological work) a Fellow of the British Academy in 2002. In 2004, he was Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London, and delivered a series of public lectures on ‘Wagner and the Erotic Impulse', which will be published in book form by Harvard University Press. In conjunction with Dreyfus's move to Oxford, Phantasm was named Consort-in-Residence in the University.

At Oxford he lectures on Bach, Wagner, and Chamber Music and offers performance classes for the MPhil in Musicology and Performance. He is interested in supervising students in a wide variety of subjects, from English consort music through to studies in late-19th-century German music.

 

Matti Raekallio has established a dual career: he is both a pianist with a large repertoire and a committed teacher, now based at the Juilliard School in New York.

Mr. Raekallio was born 1954 in Helsinki, Finland. He studied in his home country as well as in London with Maria Diamond Curcio, in Vienna at the Academy of Music with Dieter Weber, and finally in Russia at the Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) Conservatory.

Mr. Raekallio played his American debut concert in 1981 at the Carnegie (Weill) Recital Hall. Since then, he has made regular tours of the U.S.A., including solo recitals and performances with several American symphony orchestras.

He has performed complete cycles of the 32 Beethoven Sonatas, the 10 Scriabin Sonatas, and the 9 Prokofiev Sonatas, as well as altogether 62 piano concertos. These include all of Beethoven, Brahms, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev, as well as more rarely played works like the concerti by Busoni, Szymanowski and Lutoslawski. He has made about 20 CDs, including an acclaimed set of the complete Prokofiev Sonatas for Ondine Records.

In 2007 Mr. Raekallio joined the faculty of the Juilliard School in New York. From 2012, Mr. Raekallio teaches also at the Bard College in NY. From 2005 to 2010 he shuttled between USA and Europe, where he held a full professorship since 2005 at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien in Hannover, Germany. Before these positions, since 1998, he was full professor at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, where he had started teaching in 1978. In addition, he has held professorships at the Swedish Royal College of Music in Stockholm and at Western Michigan University, USA.

Mr. Raekallio's students include several top prizewinners in international piano competitions, among them the First Prize laureates in Leeds, AXA Dublin, London, Vienna (Beethoven), Isang Yun (Korea), New York (Artists International), and Budapest (Liszt-Bartók). He has been a juror in several international competitions, including Tel Aviv (Artur Rubinstein), Geneva, Helsinki, Shanghai, Vienna (Beethoven), American Pianists' Association, The Gilmore Prize, Tokyo (PTNA) and many others. He gives regular master classes in his home country as well as in the USA, Israel, China, Japan, Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark.

Mr. Raekallio's Doctorate (Dr.Mus) at the Sibelius Academy focused of the History of Piano Fingering. Subsequently, Prof. Raekallio became a member of an international research team, investigating pianists' choice of fingering from the viewpoint of cognitive psychology. Mr. Raekallio received the Leonie Sonning Foundation Grant (Denmark) in1980, and was recipient of the 5-year Artist Grant of the state of Finland three times altogether. He served for three years, 1998-2000, as a member of the Finnish Academy's Council for Research of Culture and Society. In 2009 he was named Honorary Doctor of the Estonian Academy of Music.

Abstracts

Laurence Dreyfus 

Laurence Dreyfus, PhD (Columbia), Diplôme Supérieur (Brussels), Hon RAM, FBA, D.Litt (Oxon) 

Laurence Dreyfus, University Lecturer and Fellow of Magdalen College, was born in Boston, Mass. (USA), and is a noted interpreter of Johann Sebastian Bach, both as a scholar and performer. His other interests include English consort music of the 16th and 17th centuries and the works of Richard Wagner. As an historian and analyst, Dreyfus has published Bach's Continuo Group as well asBach and the Patterns of Invention (Harvard University Press, 1987 and 1996), the latter of which won the Otto Kinkeldey Award from the American Musicological Society for the best book of the year. As a bass viol player, he has recorded CDs of Bach's viola da gamba sonatas of Marais' Pièces de violes and Rameau's Pièces de clavecin en concert (all with Ketil Haugsand on the Simax label).

In 1994, Dreyfus founded Phantasm, a quartet of viols, whose debut recording of Purcell's Viol Fantasies won a 1997 GramophoneAward. Seven further Phantasm CDs (on Simax, EMI, GMN, and Channel Classics) were devoted to works by Byrd, Mico, Locke, and Lawes, alongside a rendition of Bach's Art of Fugue. Phantasm's disc of Orlando Gibbons's Consorts (AVIE) won the 2004Gramophone Award and was a finalist for Record of the Year. Their CD from 2005 is called Four Temperaments, with Elizabethan music by Byrd, Ferrabosco, Parsons and Tallis was nominated for awards by Gramophone and the BBC Music Magazine. Most recently, Phantasm issued Jenkins Consorts in Six Parts (AVIE).

Dreyfus holds a PhD in musicology from Columbia University in New York, where he studied under noted Bach scholar Christoph Wolff. He studied cello at the Juilliard School in New York with Leonard Rose, and viol at the Royal Conservatoire with Wieland Kuijken at Brussels, which awarded him its Diplome supérieur with highest distinction. Dreyfus taught at Yale, Chicago and Stanford universities moving to London where he held a Chair at the Royal Academy of Music and King's College London as the Thurston Dart Professor of Performance Studies. He was elected an honorary member of the Royal Academy of Music in 1995 and (for his musicological work) a Fellow of the British Academy in 2002. In 2004, he was Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London, and delivered a series of public lectures on ‘Wagner and the Erotic Impulse', which will be published in book form by Harvard University Press. In conjunction with Dreyfus's move to Oxford, Phantasm was named Consort-in-Residence in the University.

At Oxford he lectures on Bach, Wagner, and Chamber Music and offers performance classes for the MPhil in Musicology and Performance. He is interested in supervising students in a wide variety of subjects, from English consort music through to studies in late-19th-century German music.

Beyond Guilt and Shame: Historical Performance as Contemporary Experience

Laurence Dreyfus (University of Oxford)

Placing the authority for musical interpretation in the hands of a scholarly discipline – a phenomenon which has failed to take root in theatre or ballet, for example, and which has had only limited success in the case of opera – brought with it benefits that could not have been dreamt of even half a century before. Not least among them was a liberation from the very sloppiness of musical traditions and their authority. Musicians of many different stripes were spurred into an Oedipal revolt against their authoritarian fathers and used the opportunity to engage in fresh inquiry and bold experimentation. Indeed, the achievements of the historical performance movement have been so well-advertised as to have become one of the dominant ideologies of the performance of classical music by end of the twentieth century. At the same time it's fair to say that the desire to be ‘historically informed' on the part of early-music performers has incurred widespread feelings of guilt and shame to the extent that we often feel guilty for not being even more ‘true' to the past, ashamed of our compromises and sometimes for our ‘false advertising'.

Yet there are crucial differences between music historians and performing musicians. More often than not these differences are passed over in the attractive fantasy of a mutual aid society between scholars and performers that rarely stands up to close inspection. Whereas an historian needs evidence to back up historical assertions, performances are never successful on the basis of historical evidence. Historians too can never collect too much textual evidence or too much documentary detail. In musical performances, for example, there is a danger that  relatively trivial musical details are elevated to a position of aesthetic significance because they happen to be susceptible to reconstructive methods.              

In my own approach to performance, I've struggled since the early 1980s to work within the trajectory of ‘historically informed performance at the same time that I keep some distance from the idea that we are servants of music historians, who – wearing another hat – I honour when I come to write about – rather than play – music. In this keynote talk, I reflect on how I've come to deal with issues of  ‘pastness' and the present emotional moment via an interest in the metaphor of music as ‘lived experience'.  By ‘lived experience' I hope to capture what all good musicians are actually doing irrespective of their ideologies and socially mediated practices, namely, communing with music from the past in an attempt to grasp human perceptions, thoughts, and emotions in ever new forms. The independence of lines in 3-part consort music is an ideal place, I'll propose, to discover the sense behind musical gestures as well as an idealized locus of contemporary community and communication.

 

Matti Raekallio

Matti Raekallio has established a dual career: he is both a pianist with a large repertoire and a committed teacher, now based at the Juilliard School in New York. Mr. Raekallio was born 1954 in Helsinki, Finland. He studied in his home country as well as in London with Maria Diamond Curcio, in Vienna at the Academy of Music with Dieter Weber, and finally in Russia at the Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) Conservatory.

Mr. Raekallio played his American debut concert in 1981 at the Carnegie (Weill) Recital Hall. Since then, he has made regular tours of the U.S.A., including solo recitals and performances with several American symphony orchestras. He has performed complete cycles of the 32 Beethoven Sonatas, the 10 Scriabin Sonatas, and the 9 Prokofiev Sonatas, as well as altogether 62 piano concertos. These include all of Beethoven, Brahms, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev, as well as more rarely played works like the concerti by Busoni, Szymanowski and Lutoslawski. He has made about 20 CDs, including an acclaimed set of the complete Prokofiev Sonatas for Ondine Records.

In 2007 Mr. Raekallio joined the faculty of the Juilliard School in New York. From 2012, Mr. Raekallio teaches also at the Bard College in NY. From 2005 to 2010 he shuttled between USA and Europe, where he held a full professorship since 2005 at the Hochschule für Musik, Theater und Medien in Hannover, Germany. Before these positions, since 1998, he was full professor at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, where he had started teaching in 1978. In addition, he has held professorships at the Swedish Royal College of Music in Stockholm and at Western Michigan University, USA. Mr. Raekallio's students include several top prizewinners in international piano competitions, among them the First Prize laureates in Leeds, AXA Dublin, London, Vienna (Beethoven), Isang Yun (Korea), New York (Artists International), and Budapest (Liszt-Bartók). He has been a juror in several international competitions, including Tel Aviv (Artur Rubinstein), Geneva, Helsinki, Shanghai, Vienna (Beethoven), American Pianists' Association, The Gilmore Prize, Tokyo (PTNA) and many others. He gives regular master classes in his home country as well as in the USA, Israel, China, Japan, Germany, Great Britain, Holland, Austria, Sweden, and Denmark.

Mr. Raekallio's Doctorate (Dr.Mus) at the Sibelius Academy focused of the History of Piano Fingering. Subsequently, Prof. Raekallio became a member of an international research team, investigating pianists' choice of fingering from the viewpoint of cognitive psychology. Mr. Raekallio received the Leonie Sonning Foundation Grant (Denmark) in1980, and was recipient of the 5-year Artist Grant of the state of Finland three times altogether. He served for three years, 1998-2000, as a member of the Finnish Academy's Council for Research of Culture and Society. In 2009 he was named Honorary Doctor of the Estonian Academy of Music.

 

Germanic Aspects on Sonata Forms

Matti Raekallio

My keynote address of today is a performance combining music and speech. The main objective is to provide a miniature case study of performing two very different sonata forms, one of the central organizing principles in Western classical music. While doing that, I also look back at, and sideways from, my work as a pianist. The viewpoint emphasizes both intro- and retrospection.

Sonatas of various kinds have always been important objects of my concert performances and also of my pedagogical work. The cycle of the entire Beethoven Sonatas was central to my DMus examination at the Sibelius Academy at a certain point in the previous millennium. My concert repertoire in the 1990's has also included the complete cycles of piano sonatas of Scriabin and Prokofiev. On the other hand: speaking, besides playing and sometimes instead of it, and remarkably often also nonsensical speaking, has been for decades an essential tool in my daily work as professor of piano. However, the juxtaposition of precisely these two works serves also as an illustration of the less typical possibilities of both the specific musical form and oral communication in general. The special cases, the aberrations, often best elucidate the norm.

The structure that is commonly but not unproblematically called ‘sonata form' has been a mainstay of the last three hundred years of large-scale compositions in Europe and later also elsewhere. It has been especially important in Germanic countries, and even the 19th century musicologists who first defined the principle, as we now know it, were German. Adolf Bernhard Marx is reputed to have premiered the fateful coinage of the two words, the term ‘Sonata Form', in 1845.

The musicians in the audience are completely familiar with the sonata concept; for the others suffice it to say that what is currently referred to as ‘sonata form' is essentially an organization that is based on conflict and its resolution. The tension may focus on harmonic or thematic contrasts, or both, or neither. The opposing elements simultaneously necessitate and complement each other, forming a dynamic entity very much like the yin and yang of Chinese philosophy. However, as the Ursonate by Kurt Schwitters demonstrates, the material that is elaborated according to the tradition of the sonata form does not have to be conventionally musical to yield recognizably sonata-esque results.

Beethoven's Op.109 is an exceptional work, as are all of his late piano sonatas. The composer turns certain conventions upside down, for instance in the first movement: there the first theme provides a light and lyrical statement, opposed by the heavily rhetorical and strong second subject – which is exactly the opposite of what is "officially" supposed to happen in a first-movement of a sonata. Furthermore, the angular dualism of the first movement is repeated quasi fractally in the structure of the entire work. The organization is almost like a Russian matrjoshka doll: inside the Manichean dichotomy of the complete work, with the first two movements opposed to each other, and with the two together contradicting the third, there are further two-part structures, each of which contains smaller nested dualities, always with a tension between the two parts. As in many other late works by Beethoven, there is a maniacal heightening of the dualist principle, no matter which level of the organization one looks at. It is a remarkable paradox that despite this huge structural tension and its local eruptions, the overriding expression of the sonata is serene and, in the end, transcendentally calm.

Kurt Schwitters was a German artist, born in Hanover. He was a multitalent who is perhaps best known for his Dada-and surrealism- influenced works in various genres. His  "Ursonate" took decades to reach its final from. Schwitters started working on it in 1922, and finished it at some point in the 1940's. The name means "Original Sonata" or "Primeval Sonata". It is a massive work in four movements, designed according to the sonata tradition: Introduction and First movement, Second movement (Largo), Third Movement (Scherzo-Trio-Scherzo da capo), and Finale (Presto-Cadenza-Coda). Interestingly enough, despite the obvious avant-gardism, a few of the compositional procedures that Schwitters uses in the elaboration of his material can be traced back to some of musical classicism's favorite tools ("Verkürzung", ‘Developing variation', etc.)

This performance is also, at least in part, a characteristic example of my work as a pianist. The idea of the sonata, in whatever guises it may appear and when understood above all as a conflict-driven entity, has continued to interest me since the beginnings of my musical work. The drama, the dynamism, the power, and the passion of the organizational principle what we call a sonata remains fascinating to me, no matter how many times the tensions get built and resolved, and whatever they may be about.

 

Abstracts of Lecturers

Accommodation

We have reserved accommodation quota for conference guests in a hotel nearby the conference venue (Helsinki Music Centre, Mannerheimintie 13 A). Each participant makes his/her hotel reservations and pays the accommodation individually. Please use the title of conference Doctors in Performance for your reservation to access the negotiated hotel rates. The quota is valid until 4th of August 2014.

The festival organizers do not guarantee the availability of hotel rooms after the negotiated quota deadlines. It is, however, recommended that conference participants check the situation directly from the hotels and ask for cancellations after the quota deadline.

Confirmed hotel quotas and rates

Hotel Helka

  • Address: Pohjoinen Rautatiekatu 23, located only 5 minute walk/400m to the conference venue.
  • Single Room for a night 125€/day (friday and saturday 103€) including breakfast buffet, sauna and wifi. 
  • Reservations: reservations@helka.fi. Reservation code "Doctors In Performance".
  • Website: http://www.helka.fi/en
 

Program

DOCTORS IN PERFORMANCE

4-5 SEPTEMBER 2014 – HELSINKI MUSIC CENTRE

 

Conference Schedule on Thursday 4 September

 

Time

Camerata Hall

Black Box

9-10 am

Registration

(Rehearsal Füzesséry)

10-

10.15 am

Opening of the Conference

Tuire Kuusi, Anu Vehviläinen

Introduction of Matti Raekallio

by Kari Kurkela

-

10.15-

11.30 am

Keynote Matti Raekallio

Germanic Aspects in Sonata Forms Chair Kari Kurkela

-

11.30-

1 pm

Lunch (Rehearsal A. Vehviläinen)

Lunch (Rehearsal Piirainen)

1-2 pm

 

Recital Anu Vehviläinen, pianoSzymanowski and the Multi-Layered Sonority

Chair Marcus Castrén

Lecture concert Anne Elisabeth Piirainen Jewish Themes in Classical Clarinet

Chair Margit Rahkonen

2-3 pm

Recital Olivia Sham, piano

Liszt and the Art of Remembering

Chair Margit Rahkonen

Piia Kleemola-Välimäki, fiddle. Lecture concert Archive Material as a Source of Artistic Research

Chair Kristiina Ilmonen

3-3.30 pm

Refreshments

Refreshments

3.30-

4-30 pm

Recital Ikuko Inoguchi, piano

The Notions of Time in the Piano Works of  John Cage, George Crumb, and Tōru Takemitsu, and How to Respond to Them in Performance

Chair Elisa Järvi

Recital Aura Go, piano

Rautavaara's World: Piano Music of Sibelius, A. Merikanto and Rautavaara

 

Chair Risto Kyrö

4.45-

6 pm

(Panel discussion in Auditorium)

 

-

6-7 pm

Transfer to the Old Court Hall

(not organized)

-

7-8 pm

Reception of Helsinki City at the Old Court Hall, address: Aleksanterinkatu 20

-

 

Time

Organo Hall

Auditorium

9-10 am

 

(Rehearsal Papadopoulou))

10-

10.15 am

-10–11 am

(Rehearsal Sofronitsky/Walther)

-

10.15-

11.30 am

-

-

11.30-

1 pm

Lunch

Lunch

1-2 pm

 

Recital Anne Pustlauk flute & Toby Sermeus fortepiano 19th-century Performance Practice on the Keyed Flute

Chair Mikael Helasvuo

Assi Karttunen Paper The Music-Related Movements of la danse grotesque in Rameau's Les Sauvages

Päivi Järviö Paper Re-Presenting the Past The Body of the Performer as a Locus for the Study of Music HistoryChair Anne Sivuoja-Kauppala

2-3 pm

Recital Markus Kuikka gamba

French Music for Solo Viol before Sainte-Colombe

Chair Tuija Hakkila

Elisabeth Belgrano PaperLessons in the Shadow of je-ne-sais-quoi: A Study of Vocal Ornamentation and Human Disaster

Minna Hovi Paper: Froberger's Tombeau as a window to art of dying

Chair A. Sivuoja-Kauppala

3-3.30 pm

Refreshments

Refreshments

3.30-

4-30 pm

Lecture concert Judith Zsovár soprano Handel's Exeption – Anna Maria Strada: The Dramatic Lyricism of a Prima Donna Going Beyond the Borders of Voice Type

Chair Päivi Järviö

Eerik Jõks Paper Pros and Cons of Metamorphosis: A Journey from Prescriptive Notation to Descriptive Notation through Performance of  Gregorian Chant Chair Peter Peitsalo

Ruta Lipinaityte Paper The orchestra concertmaster as a polyfunctional figure Chair Annikka Konttori-Gustafsson

4.45-

6 pm

 

(Rehearsal Kyrö)

Panel discussion The meaning of artistic doctoral studies in musical life and society

Chair Kari Kurkela

6-7 pm

(Rehearsal Kyrö)

-

7-8 pm

(Rehearsal Sofronitsky/Graf)

-


 

Conference Schedule on Friday 5 September

 

Time

Camerata Hall

Black Box

9-10 am

Registration

 

10-

10.15 am

-

-

10.15-

11.30 am

-

(Rehearsals: Jenny Robson 11–12.15, A-K Pippuri 12.15–13)

11.30-

1 pm

Lunch

Lunch

1-2 pm

 

Lecture concert Elisa Järvi, piano & Libero Mureddu, tech. assistantTowards a Quarter-Tone-PianoChair Tuire Kuusi

Recital Anna-Kaisa Pippuri oboe New Perspectives on the Oboe

Chair Marcus Castrén

2-3 pm

Recital Mikko Raasakka, clar. & Antti Vahtola, piano Contemporary Finnish Music for Clarinet

Chair Tuire Kuusi

Lecture concert Andrea Stewart, cello Modernizing our Methods: An Exploration of Innovative and Extended Techniques in Contemporary Music for Cello

Chair A. Sivuoja-Kauppala

3-3.30 pm

Refreshments

Refreshments

(Rehearsal Füzesséry)

3.30-

4-30 pm

Recital Sonja Fräki, piano

Fräki Meets Aho: Sonja Fräki's Piano Recital  focused on Kalevi Aho's Solo Piano Works

Chair Annikka Konttori-Gustafsson

Lecture concert Zoltan Füzesséry, piano Potentiality in Beethoven's Piano Sonata A-flat Major, Op. 110:       A Structural and Pianistic Tension Analysis

 

Chair Margit Rahkonen

4.30-

5.30 pm

Lecture concert Maija Parko, piano, Jenni Lättilä sopranoOdours, Sounds and Illuminations:Two Poems from Charles Baudelaire's "Les fleurs du mal" As Set by  Claude Debussy Chair Annikka Konttori-Gustafsson

Lecture concert Jenny Robson voice/quartet The Challenges in Vocal Jazz Improvisation

Chair J-P Uotila

5.30-6 pm

Open discussion at Agora lobby & sparkling wine

-

8 pm

Conference dinner at Restaurant Sipuli

-

 

Time

Organo Hall

Auditorium

9-10 am

(Rehearsal Dreyfus)

-

10-

10.15 am

Introduction of Keynote Laurence Dreyfus by

Erik T. Tawaststjerna

-

10.15-

11.30 am

Keynote Laurence DreyfusBeyond Guilt and Shame: Historical Performance as Contemporary Experience

Laurence Dreyfus & Phantasm

Chair Erik T. Tawaststjerna

-

11.30-

1 pm

Lunch

Lunch

1-2 pm

 

Recital Assi Karttunen, harpsichord & ensemble Les Sauvages—the Music-Related Movements of la danse grotesque in Rameau's Music

Chair Kati Hämäläinen

Lecture concert Hanni Autere, fiddle, vocal Fiddle-Singing-"I did it my way"

Chair Piia Kleemola-Välimäki

2-3 pm

Lecture concert Risto Kyrö fortepiano & ensemble Franz Schubert's One and Only Composition Concert in the Scenery of Viennese Musical Life in 1828.

Chair Kati Hämäläinen

Lecture concert Vasiliki Papadopoulou, violinPerforming Instructive Editions of J. S. Bach's Sei Solo for Violin

Chair Lauri Suurpää

3-3.30 pm

Refreshments

Refreshments

3.30-

4-30 pm

Recital Sergei Istomin cello & Viviana Sofronitsky fortepiano

Beethoven works for cello and pianoforte 

Chair Assi Karttunen

Gerriet K. Sharma, paperComposing Sculptural Sound Phenomena in Computer Music

Chair Marcus Castrén

 

Ian Cook, paper The Tempo Indications of Mozart: A Performer's Perspective Based on a Scholarly Discourse Supported by Historically Informed Performance Practice.

 Chair Lauri Suurpää

4.30-

5.30 pm

Recital Otto Tolonen guitar & Debi Wong mezzo-soprano The Winter of Our Discontent

Chair Assi Karttunen

 

Per Högberg, paper Organ Singing and Hymn Playing: Performing Congregational Song Chair Peter Peitsalo

 

Sergei Istomin, paper

German Contributions to the 19th Century Moscow Violoncello School: A Different Approach to P. Tchaikovsky's Rococo Variations (Chronology, Events, Personalities at the Time of Composition, and the First Editions).

Chair Peter Peitsalo

5.30-6 pm

(Open discussion & sparkling wine at Agora lobby)

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8 pm

(Conference dinner)

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Rehearsals

Rehearsal schedule at 3rd September 2014 in the Helsinki Music Centre

Please try to work with times scheduled below. It is based to offer supporting staff for the performers who required it.

 

Camerata Hall:

 

10 am Anu Vehviläinen

11 am Maija Parko and Jenni Lättilä

12 am Elisa Järvi and Libero Mureddu

1 pm   Mikko Raasakka and Antti Vahtola

2 pm  

3 pm   Sonja Fräki

4 pm  Ikuko Inoguchi

5 pm   Olivia Sham

6 pm Matti Raekallio

Organo Hall

 

10 am Viviana Sofronitsky

11 am  Markus Kuikka

12 am  Assi Karttunen & ensemble

1 pm   Otto Tolonen and Deborah Wong

2 pm   Risto Kyrö

3 pm   Sergei Istomin

4 pm   Anne Pustlauk

5 pm   Harpsichord tuning

6 pm   Judit Zsovár

7 pm   Laurence Dreyfus

Black Box

 

11 am

12 am Aura Go

1 pm

2 pm   Jenny Robson and ensemble

3 pm   Piia Kleemola-Välimäki

4 pm   Anna-Kaisa Pippuri

5 pm   Anne Piirainen

6 pm   Zoltan Füzesséry

7 pm   Andrea Stewart